Travel to Canada

Day 3 Banff N.P. – Lake Louise area (98 Km.)

Lake Louise: Lake Louise, located at 1540 meters high, is the second largest urban center in the Banff National Park, just behind the town of Banff, and therefore is one of the best places to start the many tours that can be perform in the area. The major attractions of this area are the Moraine Lake and Lake Louise. Proof of this is that in summer the parking of both lakes are completely full. This is why it is important to try to visit early or late in the day if we want to find a place to park.

Moraine Lake

Moraine Lake

The Moraine Lake and Valley of the Ten Peaks are located 15 km. of the village of Lake Louise. Although not as well known as Lake Louise, Moraine Lake has little to envy the first. Beside the lake, a bright turquoise blue, there is a nice refuge offering accommodation, food and canoe rental. In this area we saw a lot of squirrels in search of food.

Moraine Lake

Moraine Lake

From the lake start several paths: one is the north shore for 1.5 km (half hour), while climbing that follows the path of the Larch Valley Sentinel Pass offers exciting views and culminates in one of the highest mountain pass in the park. To make any of these tours is required to make them in groups of at least six people, to minimize the possibility of meeting with one of the many grizzly bears that inhabit this area.

Moraine Lake

Moraine Lake

Lake Louise is a jewel set against the backdrop of Victoria Glacier and is one of the most popular spots of the Rockies for their beauty. A Scottish bagpiper strolls among the flowers and pine trees in the gardens of the Chateau Lake Louise, while the sound of their music echoed in the surrounding peaks. The most romantic can rent canoes and sigh while rowing on the lake, and those who prefer more athletic activities can make a trip of 3 km. to Lake Agnes, where there is a cofee shop located on top of a waterfall.

Lake Louise

Lake Louise

Lake Louise (1731 meters high) has a beauty that is an emblematic image. Famous for its deep blue waters and snow-capped peaks surrounding the lake also hosts the Victoria Glacier, which stretches almost to the water´s edge. Known to the Stoney Indians as the "lake of small fish" was named "Lake Louise" in 1884 in honor of Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, daughter of Queen Victoria. At one end of the lake, the imposing Chateau Lake Louise (1894) dominates the landscape.

Lake Louise

Lake Louise

The paths of the surrounding incorporated information panels about the formation of the lake about 10,000 years ago, at the end of the last glaciation. The striking color of the water is due to glacial silt deposits (known as rock flour) that lie beneath the surface. There is an easily accessible way that leaves the Chateau Lake Louise hotel that leads to the end of the lake (1 hour each way, more or less). This way we can get away a bit of noise next to the hotel and enjoy views of the lake with a little more calm.

Lake Louise

Lake Louise

At the other side of the village, about 4.5 km. far, is the Lake Louise Sightseeing Gondola, a cable car that in summer rises to Mount Whitehorn, offering spectacular views of the glacier and the lake. In winter, the area is very popular with skiers, ice climbers and snowboarders.